Friday, January 30, 2015

A Super Columbus, Mississippi Weekend

It’s Friday. Let’s talk about a non-traditional aspect of real estate. Let’s highlight community events. Why? Anyone relocating to this area wants to know about local events in the hopes of finding people in their new community with similar interests. Let’s provide some very specific examples of events this weekend in Columbus, Mississippi.

Dr. Valentin Mihai Bogdan is an assistant professor of music at Mississippi University for Women. He will perform a solo piano recital Friday at 7:30 p.m. in the Connie Sills Kossen Auditorium of Poindexter Hall. His recital features various musical genres including the classical, romantic and modern periods.

The Columbus Arts Council and Columbus-Lowndes Public Library have partnered on a six-week reading program to encouraged young people to unlock their imagination through reading. It’s called, “The Big Read.” This Saturday at 11:00 a.m. let Mother Goose read to the children “Kusiky, A child from Taquile, Peru.” That’s this week’s Children's Tea Party and Story Time with Mother Goose.

On December 13th a horrible motorcycle accident happened just north of the Dutch Village on Highway 12 in East Columbus. That accident claimed the life of a 41 year old man and his 12 year old son. This Saturday there is a benefit that organizers hope will raise enough money to pay any remaining funeral expenses and purchase grave markers. 

Local motorcyclists plan leaving the Old Country Store on Highway 12 and Woodlawn Road in Steens at 9:30 a.m. The Memorial Ride makes it way past the accident site and proceeds to the Community Center on Stadium Road in New Hope.  There, at the Community Center, is a day filled with plenty of activities for adults and the children. Vendors have food and various items for purchase. The bikers should arrive at the Community Center by 11:00 a.m. The Community Center opens 10:00 a.m. and closes at 6:00 p.m.

It’s Super Bowl weekend. Many activities take place Sunday afternoon and evening with the center piece a viewing of the big game between Seattle and New England. Many area restaurants and churches have special events. The commercials seem to be more entertaining that the game itself. Companies selling alcoholic beverages sponsor many of the ads. Statistically, about 18 percent of the Super Bowl audience is under the age of 21. That means parents need to “GET IN THE GAME!” with a safety reminder to younger family members.

Anyone have another real estate need this weekend? Please make a private preview appointment at least 24-hours in advance. Contact your REALTOR® today.
_________________________________________

Andy Kalinowski is a REALTOR®, an Accredited Buyer’s Representative®, a Sales and Foreclosure Resource® and a Military Relocation Professional with CENTURY 21 Doris Hardy and Associates, LLC in Columbus, Mississippi. He has a Mississippi Real Estate license. Andy is also a member of the National Association of Realtors®. Contact him by cell (or text) phone – 662.549.3421 or by e-mail – andyk@dorishardy.com.  He is also available for web video chat.

Thursday, January 29, 2015

Is a Tankless Water Heater Right for You?

If you’re debating replacing your hot water heater with a tankless version, also known as an on-demand water heater, here’s what you need to know to make the right decision.

What’s the Advantage of Going Tankless? Traditional hot water heaters typically live in your basement and provide gallons of hot water at one time: an 80-gallon tank heats enough water to shower, run a dishwasher, and do a load of laundry simultaneously. But standby energy loss is significant with traditional hot water heaters, and once you’ve exhausted the hot water supply, you’ll wait 20 to 60 minutes for the heater to cook up more.

A tankless water heater produces hot water only when you need it. When you turn on the faucet, water is heated on the spot as it flows through capillary-like pipes heated by either a powerful gas burner or electric coils. (There are no oil-fired on-demand water heaters on the market.)

By bringing hot water close to where it’s needed, you reduce energy loss and increase efficiency by 50% over a conventional hot water tank system, about $165 in annual savings for an average household.

What’s the Downside? Although a tankless water heater can pump hot water all day, it can’t produce a large amount all at once. And it can snap you out of a hot-shower bliss with the “cold water sandwich effect,” a sudden splash of cold water that results from turning the hot water faucet on and off repeatedly.

A traditional tank heater puts out 7.5 to 9.5 gallons of water per minute (GPM), enough to shower, run the dishwasher, and do a load of laundry all at the same time. The typical tankless water heater, however, puts out only 2.5 to 5 GPM, enough to handle only two uses at a time.

Be warned Not all flow rates are calculated the same. Energy Star measures GPM based on a 77-degree increase in water temperature needed to heat water, while some companies list their GPM flows at 35- and 45-degree rises. The more heat the water requires, the slower the flow rate.

Possible solution to the “cold water sandwich” Install multiple on-demand units. Because it’s small — about the size of a carry-on suitcase — you can place a tankless water heater along any stretch of pipe: In the attic, basement, closet, or crawlspace. You can install two or three units to serve different parts of the house, or even dedicate a unit for a particular use — say, a washing machine. Multiple on-demand units increase overall energy efficiency.

How Much Do They Cost?

Gas-fired tankless water heater This system costs $1,500 to buy and install, nearly double the price of a conventional gas water heater, and $575 more than a high-efficiency tank model. In addition, while a conventional water heater typically uses a half-inch gas line, a tankless water heater requires three-quarter-inch pipe. That plumbing change costs from $25 to $40 per foot, potentially adding many hundreds to initial costs. 

On the bright side, your new energy-efficient unit may qualify for a federal tax credit of up to $300 on purchase and installation through 2013.

Electric tankless water heater Much cheaper. It can cost as little as $400 installed. But it doesn’t qualify for a tax credit because it is less efficient than gas and is better suited for point-of-use applications, such as instant kitchen hot water, rather than a whole-house system.


More About Energy (and Money) Savings According to the U.S. Dept. of Energy, a tankless water heater is more efficient and uses less energy than a conventional water heater, providing a $25 to $107 in annual savings.

If your hot water use is low (less than 41 gallons per day), a tankless water heater will be 24% to 34% more efficient.

If your hot water usage is high (about 86 gallons per day), a tankless water heater is 8% to 14% more energy efficient.

Installing an on-demand unit at each hot water faucet gives an energy savings of 27% to 50%.

More Advice on Hot Water Heaters:
____________________________________
Joe Bousquin wrote this article appeared on National Association of Realtors® web site and is used with permission. His work has appeared in the Wall Street Journal, Kiplinger’s Personal Finance, and Men’s Journal. He owns a 79-year-old home in Sacramento, Calif.

Visit Houselogic.com for more articles like this. Reprinted from HouseLogic.com with permission of the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®.


Andy Kalinowski is a REALTOR®, an Accredited Buyer’s Representative®, a Short Sales and Foreclosure Resource® and a Military Relocation Professional with CENTURY 21 Doris Hardy and Associates, LLC in Columbus, Mississippi. He has a Mississippi Real Estate license. Andy is also a member of the National Association of Realtors®. Contact him by cell (or text) phone – 662.549.3421 or by e-mail – andyk@dorishardy.com.  He is also available for web video chat.

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

How Much Money Do I Need To Buy A Home? (Part 3 of 3)



In the first two parts of this series, we explained the out of pocket expenses a buyer needs to anticipate when buying a home. Today let’s consider just the monthly mortgage payment.

Recap – The buyer paid for a credit report. He wrote a check for earnest money, even though he might receive a full refund of earnest money at the closing table. He probably made a down payment of 3½ percent to 30 percent of the purchase price as a down payment. He paid $400 to have the house inspected and another $500 for an appraisal. Then he had to pay the utility companies for service and incur incidental moving expenses. That’s a lot of money.

The good news is that as a home owner, much of those expenses are legitimate income tax deductions. Check with a reputable source. Still, the new homeowner needed some money. That is why saving for a home is so important. Now it’s time for the reward. That reward is probably a cash savings.

Seeing is Believing – Part of the process of getting a mortgage is the lender providing a Good Faith Estimate (GFE) to the borrower. At the very bottom of the GFE is a realistic estimate of the total monthly mortgage payment. In most cases, the difference between the GFE and the actual monthly payment might be less than one dollar. That makes the GFE very reliable.

Compare the GFE mortgage estimate to a monthly rental payment. Now it’s time to enjoy the benefits of home ownership.

No Payment Increases – With a fixed rate mortgage, the monthly mortgage payments never increase. Let’s fast forward ten years. It’s 2025. The 2025 renter pays the 2025 rental rate. A property owner that buys a house today pays the 2015 mortgage price. Let’s use this example.

Suppose a buyer purchases a house with a $100,000 mortgage for 30-years at a fixed interest rate of 3.25 percent. The monthly mortgage payment is about $435 a month. Today’s average renter pays $750 a month. Is it reasonable to assume that in 10 years that same rental unit could lease for $1000 a month? That is only a 3.5 percent annual increase in rent. Most researchers estimate a 5 percent annual rent increase. The key point to remember is that the wise person that buys a home today pays 2015 prices well into the future.

Taxes and Insurance – Unlike the actual mortgage payment, the tax and insurance components do fluctuate. For most property owners, taxes and insurance amount to about a fourth of the total monthly payment. Landlords pass along tax and insurance increases to their tenants. There is still another word about insurance.

Insurance – There are several types of property insurance. Individual property owners make decisions on the types of desired coverage. All lenders require insurance against a lawsuit if someone gets hurt on the property. Optional coverage can include claims damage against fire, theft, flood, earthquake, or other types of natural disasters. Some carriers offer reduced rates for homes with security systems or other types of devices that reduce the risk of claims against the policy. Because of the competitive rates, many homeowners also insure their personal property at the same time.

Another type of insurance warrants the major systems within the house, such as heating and cooling, plumbing, electrical and so forth. Some policies even help with paying to address routine maintenance. The best advice is to visit with your insurance agent annually to review coverage and discuss new options.

While these add to the cost of home ownership, they can reduce the cost when replacing items as a result of something unforeseen or unanticipated.

Most renters do not have insurance. If a fire or other type of disaster destroys the building, the landlord receives compensation for the loss of structure. The tenant receives no compensation for loss of personal possessions, unless they have renters insurance. Why? Notice the key word “personal.” If a tragedy destroyed uninsured personal property, it could not have been too valuable. Otherwise the tenant would have had it insured. The landlord cannot insure someone else’s personal property either.

Tax Incentives – A property owner has dozens of tax loopholes that reduce federal and state income taxes. These incentives apply only to property owners and not renters. That is why homeowners file the “long form” to itemize deductions. By itemizing deductions, a taxpayer legally incurs lower taxes because of the deductions.

One of those deductions is the interest paid on the mortgage. Another popular deduction is one for having a home office. Making energy efficiency improvements on the house is still another legitimate deduction. When it comes time to sell that property, the tax laws exempt a huge amount of the net profit from consideration as taxable income. An accountant or tax advisor has specific information.

Where Do The Savings Begin – Begin by talking to your REALTOR® about the true cost of home ownership. Map out a strategy that includes a timetable for saving the money needed to make the purchase and preview houses within the price point.
_________________________________

Andy Kalinowski is a REALTOR®, an Accredited Buyer’s Representative®, a Short Sales and Foreclosure Resource® and a Military Relocation Professional with CENTURY 21 Doris Hardy and Associates, LLC in Columbus, Mississippi. He has a Mississippi Real Estate license. Andy is also a member of the National Association of Realtors®. Contact him by cell (or text) phone – 662.549.3421 or by e-mail – andyk@dorishardy.com.  He is also available for web video chat.

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

How Much Money Do I Need To Buy A Home? (Part 2 of 3)


 Yesterday we began a discussion of the one-time costs to buy a home. We continue that today by discussing the remaining one-time costs of purchase after the buyer and seller agree on the purchase price. These are the costs a buyer needs to save for and anticipate when buying a home. Let’s discuss them in detail. Then tomorrow we’ll discuss the recurring monthly costs of home ownership.

Home Inspection – Hiring a trained, licensed and bonded home inspector reduces the risk that the buyer will have unexpected problems or hidden defects with the house. The home inspector spends about 3 to 4 hours on the premises to evaluate the house against current building and safety standards.

The home inspector has no stake in the outcome of the transaction. That makes his opinion valuable. A house with more than 2500 square feet generally cost more to inspect. Most inspectors charge about $350 and receive payment at the conclusion of the inspection. Having a home inspection is an optional expense, but it is one that any home buyer should exercise.

Appraisal – Every mortgage lender wants the house appraised. The lender wants an independent opinion on the value of the property.

No one will lend $100,000 on a house worth only $50,000. Conversely, every lender will gladly loan $100,000 on a $150,000 house. The appraiser determines that value. The appraised value must equal or exceed the purchase price, not the loan amount.

Some loans have different requirements. As an example, the terms of a Veterans Administration mortgage requires conveying a house with no wood rot issues. The appraiser also acts as the “eyes” of the lender.

Some lenders require the borrower to pay for the appraisal immediately upon completion. Ask the lender. Most appraisers charge about $500.

Survey – There are a few transactions require a survey. If someone is buying a large amount of acreage, it’s best to get a survey. Another survey scenario is when a property owner sells only a portion of this property. Sometimes two buyers wish to combine three adjoining parcels to make two parcels. The survey sets the new boundary lines.

Unless there is a major property dispute, most lenders and mortgages no longer require a survey, especially if the house is in a platted subdivision. Surveyors have different fees depending on the scope of work. The surveyor normally wants his fees immediately because there is no assurance the transaction will close.

Closing Costs – This is a general term that could mean three things. Actual closing costs mean the legal and contractual expenses to close the transaction. The fees for the title search, deed preparation, recording fees, and so forth are true closing costs.

Many lenders also lump the expenses to process a mortgage into the closing costs. These include mortgage origination, underwriting, transmitting the closing papers to the attorney, and adding the expense for a final credit check within hours of the actual closing.

Pre-paid items or pre-paids is the third component to closing costs. Mortgage lenders increase the monthly mortgage payment to collect a prorated share of property taxes and insurance. They place that money into a special savings account called escrow. Upon receipt of the tax and insurance bills, the lender immediately pays those bills from escrow.

Most lenders insist a borrower have two to four months of advance pre-payments when they open the escrow account. That insures there is always money in the account and helps defray losses in the event of a missed payment.

Who pays for any of these closing costs? It’s the buyer’s responsibility. Some sellers offer to pay for all or some. That makes closing costs a part of contract negotiations.

A mortgage lender or REALTOR® can provide estimated closing costs, based on the purchase price. Closing costs correlate to the amount of the purchase and the amount of the mortgage.

Moving expenses – When it comes time to actually move, budget for moving expenses. These include transferring public utility accounts, moving truck rental, and similar actions. Every owner makes small changes. Budget for purchasing incidental items that suit the new owner’s personal tastes.

The End Is Just Beginning – Yesterday and today we highlighted the cash a buyer needs to purchase a home. Tomorrow, we’ll look at the monthly costs of home ownership. Those needing a quicker answer or want specific information need to contact your REALTOR®
____________________________________

Andy Kalinowski is a REALTOR, an Accredited Buyer’s Representative®, a Short Sales and  Foreclosure Resource® and a Military Relocation Professional with CENTURY 21 Doris Hardy and Associates, LLC in Columbus, Mississippi. He has a Mississippi Real Estate license. Andy is also a member of the National Association of Realtors®. Contact him by cell (or text) phone – 662.549.3421 or by e-mail – andyk@dorishardy.com.  He is also available for web video chat.

Monday, January 26, 2015

How Much Money Do I Need To Buy A Home? (Part 1 of 3)

In today’s information rich world, many prospective homebuyers realize the actual cash savings in homeownership versus renting. But there is a problem. Exactly how much money does it cost to purchase a home? What are the out-of-pocket expenses in the purchase process? Are they reimbursable? Are the negotiable? How much money does it cost each month to own a home? Let’s try to answer those questions this week. Today let’s begin with a review of some of the one-time costs of making a home purchase.

Mortgage Pre-Approval – Getting pre-approved is the surest way to determine the financial limit on the proposed purchase. Part of the process is for the lender to request a credit report. The credit bureau charges the requester for this service.

That is why some lenders charge for this. They pass along that cost to the consumer. Other lenders offer what appears as a “free” credit report. It’s not free. The lender uses this as a method to increase business. If there is a charge, anticipate a nominal $50 charge for requesting a credit report.

Some lenders also use this fee as a method to gauge a specific buyer’s level of purchase motivation. A casual buyer with no real intent to buy a home frowns on paying for a service they will not likely use. A person that is very serious about buying a house has a different outlook.

They look on paying for a credit score like getting on a toll road. That is the road leading towards where they want to go – owning their home.

Earnest Money – When the home buyer writes a purchase contract, they also provide the REALTOR® with earnest money. This is part of every real estate transaction. Earnest money demonstrates to the seller that the buyer is “earnest” about making the purchase. Knowing the buyer now has a large financial stake in the transaction, the seller removes his house from the market until the closing.

There is no legal, minimum or customary amount of earnest money. Each transaction is different. A seller can ask a buyer to increase the amount of earnest money during negotiations. This normally happens when a buyer write a very small earnest money amount or delays the closing for more than three months. On the other hand, a buyer can send an unmistakable signal of serious purchase intent with a large earnest money check.

Should the buyer breach the terms of the purchase contract, the seller receives the earnest money in lieu of civil damages. This is because the seller took the house off the market and possibly missed another buyer. Should the seller breach the contract, the buyer receives the entire amount of earnest money.

For budgeting purposes, a buyer should plan on writing an earnest money check for $500 to $5000. Much depends on the type of house purchased and the anticipated closing date. The buyer’s agent brings the earnest money check to the closing.

Down Payment – It is very common for a buyer to use all of the earnest money as a portion of the down payment. The type of mortgage determines the amount of the down payment. Let’s provide an example of down payment.

The buyer and seller agree on a $100,000 purchase price. An FHA mortgage might require only a 3½ percent down payment. That means the down payment on a $100,000 house is $3,500. Suppose the buyer wrote a $1,000 check for earnest money. In this example, the buyer brings $2,500 in certified money to the closing.

If that same buyer wrote a $1,500 earnest money check, the buyer brings $2,000 to the closing. Conversely, a buyer that writes a $500 earnest money check brings $3,000 in certified money to the closing for the down payment.

A conventional mortgage might require a 5 percent or 10 percent down payment. A conventional mortgage has less “red tape” that can delay the closing. This is the key point to remember.

The larger the amount of the down payment means the smaller the monthly mortgage payment. The down payment is part of the purchase price. Therefore, a seller cannot pay for any of the down payment.

There’s Even More – Tomorrow we’ll discuss other one-time payments involved in the purchase process. In the meantime, contact your REALTOR® about getting an estimate to buy a specific house.
____________________________
Andy Kalinowski is a REALTOR®, an Accredited Buyer’s Representative®, a Short Sales and Foreclosure Resource® and a Military Relocation Professional with CENTURY 21 Doris Hardy and Associates, LLC in Columbus, Mississippi. He is a Mississippi Real Estate license. Andy is also a member of the National Association of REALTORS®. Contact him by cell (or text) phone – 662.549.3421 or by e-mail – andyk@dorishardy.com.  He is also available for web video chat.


Friday, January 23, 2015

Many Activities In Columbus, Mississippi This Weekend

Every Friday we set aside traditional real estate information in favor of highlighting community events. Why? With an increase in local manufacturing facilities, many people find relocating to the Golden Triangle area of Mississippi makes sense. But there is always the question about the quality of life. Let’s provide some very specific examples of events this weekend in Columbus, Mississippi.

A guest artist recital, featuring soprano Susan Williams accompanied by Kevin Chance is set Friday at 7:30 p.m. in Poindexter Hall on the Mississippi University for Women campus. Williams performed in a wide range of leading opera roles and as a vocal soloist both in the US and abroad. Chance is both soloist and collaborator.  This is the second time they’ve performed together. They performed in recital on the “Live from Hochstein” series, broadcast live on WXXI radio in Rochester, N.Y.

An hour prior to the recital is a pre-concert talk, sponsored by The W’s Life Enrichment Program. The recital and pre-concert talk are both free.

Did someone you know get the Christmas present of a lifetime? Many young women find an engagement ring under the Christmas tree. Now it’s time to face the reality of that dream come true. The newly remodeled Trotter Convention Center on 5th Street between Main and Second Avenue North hosts the 22nd annual Bridal Showcase Saturday. There are two separate shows.

Doors open at 9:00 a.m. for the 10:00 a.m. fashion show. Doors reopen at 1:00 p.m. for the 2:00 p.m. fashion show. The Bridal Showcase is not only about the happy couple. It’s about family members too, possibly with a wedding to attend in a distant location. However most of the vendors will talk to the bride-elect.

Four dozens vendors offering services geared toward the wedding are available for private consultation. Vendor services include fashion, jewelry, photography, catering, rentals, lodging, travel, printers, limos, entertainment and so forth.

As an example, travel does not necessarily mean the honeymoon. It might mean finding transportation to and from the wedding location, possible ground transportation and so forth for out of town guests. Lodging could mean stays ranging from several nights for one or two people to just reserving a block of rooms the night before and the wedding night itself for special guests.

Wear comfortable clothes and especially shoes to this event. Bring a wedding planning guide to make notes about each vendor. If you do not have a business card, then print some mailing labels with your name, phone number, e-mail, and mailing address. That way you can compete for various door prizes but also have those vendors contact you for follow up during the next week.

It’s a good idea to make a list of services needed for the wedding and to ask specific questions to those vendors as a way to comparison shop. As an example, if the bridal party needs invitations printed, then make sure to ask the same questions to each of the printing companies at the Bridal Fair. Then make some decisions before a vendor has to refuse work due to an overload of customers.

This is the first event at the newly remodeled Trotter Convention Center. Interior renovations include new sound and lighting, a refinished surface on the main ballroom floor, new flooring in other areas, and updated restrooms just to name a few of the improvements. The Trotter’s exterior received a major facelift, with some of the finishing touches still in progress.

In between the two shows at the Trotter, the Frank P. Phillips YMCA on the corner of Main and 6th Streets has a combination Health Fair and Open House starting at 11:00 a.m.

Vendors from Baptist Memorial Hospital offer bone density testing, blood pressure check and information about diabetes. Mississippi University for Women has a cooking demonstration and information about healthy eating. There are also tours of YMCA itself that include information about regularly class offerings such as POUND Rockout, Workout™, SPINNING®, Zumba®, R.I.P.P.E.D.™.

Interested in creative writing? Interested in local history? If so then make your way to Riverwalk Park on Main Street Saturday afternoon. “Columbus OUR BRIDGE” is a writing project. Meet the Tenn-Tom Bridge in Riverwalk Park. This is a project sponsored by the Columbus Arts Council.

Anyone have another real estate need this weekend? Please make a private preview appointment at least 24-hours in advance. Contact your REALTOR® today.
_________________________________________
Andy Kalinowski is a REALTOR®, an Accredited Buyer’s Representative®, a Sales and Foreclosure Resource® and a Military Relocation Professional with CENTURY 21 Doris Hardy and Associates, LLC in Columbus, Mississippi. He has a Mississippi Real Estate license. Andy is also a member of the National Association of Realtors®. Contact him by cell (or text) phone – 662.549.3421 or by e-mail – andyk@dorishardy.com.  He is also available for web video chat.

Thursday, January 22, 2015

When is the Best Time to Buy Appliances?

A major appliance should never be an impulse buy. We pinpoint the best moments to buy, on and offline.

When it comes to landing bargains on major appliances, timing is everything. And the best time to buy home appliances is when stores need you more than you need a new home appliance.

Generally, that means you can get more value for your money:

September, October, and January when manufacturers roll out new home appliance models, and retailers are eager to move last year’s inventory. (Refrigerators are the exception. New models come out in the spring.)

Last days of the month when stores are desperate to meet quotas and are more likely to dicker over prices.

Thursday, the day before the weekend rush when aisles are less crowded.

Major holidays — Labor Day, Memorial Day, President’s Day, Black Thursday (Friday, Saturday) — when stores take advantage of your day off and slash prices.

Fall and winter are the best seasons to buy air conditioners and gas grills, because few buyers think about warm-weather appliances when leaves and snow cover the ground.

Related:

Online BargainsYou can’t haggle with a website, so buying appliances online is more computer science than art of the deal. That’s where online data trackers, like Hukkster and TrackIf, can help you find the best time to get the best deals.

After crunching some numbers for us, TrackIf CEO Doug Berg pinpointed the very best times to buy appliances online:

 – November

 – Thursdays (Retailers are twice as likely to reduce prices on Thursdays.)

 – The 4th or 5th of the month (when people get their paychecks), and the 23rd to 29th of the month (quota desperation).

 – 3 p.m.

So, theoretically, the very best time to buy appliances online would be the last Thursday of November at 3 p.m. In other words: Thanksgiving. (Baste your bird and buy a new oven.)

More Appliance Buying TipsIn store, don’t be afraid to haggle over prices. The squeaky wheel often gets an additional discount, and it costs you nothing to say, “Is this the best price you can give me?”

When shopping online, compare prices using different browsers. An appliance deal viewed on Firefox could be priced differently when viewed on Safari.

Many stores offer additional discounts if you apply for their credit card. (But only apply if your credit score can handle another card.)

Sometimes appliance repair businesses stock slightly used or flawed — but deeply discounted — appliances. Check with your service guy before buying retail. (I bought a double oven this way and saved $700!)

If you can’t shop on sales days, you may discover the next time the store is going to lower prices by peeking into the metal price stand next to the appliance, which often is stuffed with cards stating the price and date of upcoming sales.

Related:
____________________________________
Lisa Kaplan Gordon wrote this article appeared on National Association of Realtors® web site and is used with permission. She is an avid gardener, a member of the Fairfax County Master Gardeners Association, and a builder of luxury homes in McLean, Va. She’s been a Homes editor for Gannett News Service and has reviewed home improvement products for AOL. Follow Lisa on Google+.

Visit Houselogic.com for more articles like this. Reprinted from HouseLogic.com with permission of the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®.


Andy Kalinowski is a REALTOR®, an Accredited Buyer’s Representative®, a Short Sales and Foreclosure Resource® and a Military Relocation Professional with CENTURY 21 Doris Hardy and Associates, LLC in Columbus, Mississippi. He has a Mississippi Real Estate license. Andy is also a member of the National Association of Realtors®. Contact him by cell (or text) phone – 662.549.3421 or by e-mail – andyk@dorishardy.com.  He is also available for web video chat.